Thank you for visiting Lovely Rosamund Pike, your online resource dedicated to British actress Rosamund Pike. You may know Rosamund from "Gone Girl", "The World's End", "Pride & Prejudice" and many more. Soon Rosamund will be seen in several films such as "A United Kingdom", "HHhH" and many more.

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Archive for the ‘Film Reviews’ Category
09.13.2017
C.   /   Film Reviews#Hostiles   /   0 Comments

Now that “Hostiles” has screened at Telluride Film Festival the first review is in. THR has released a review and it looks very good!

The specter of sudden and brutal death hangs over everyone all the time in Hostiles, a mournful, sorrowful, persistently powerful Western set in a world of beauty, tears and blood. There’s little new that writer-director Scott Cooper, in his fourth and best feature, can really add to what other films have said about the terrible inevitabilities embedded in the epic story of the settling of America’s frontier. But potent dramatic dynamics and the filmmaker’s self-evident deep immersion and investment in his material enrich this vivid account of the last spasms of Native American resistance in the 1890s. Attracting a significant theatrical audience to this grim tale will be an imposing task, whereas the cast and subject matter might actually attract considerably more discerning viewers on home screens.

Setting out from the red-and-sand-colored landscapes of the little-populated desert, Blocker leads a small party of soldiers (which diversely includes a black man as well as a West Point graduate), along with Yellowhawk and a few of his family members. In short order they come across the catatonic Pike, who naturally becomes hysterical at the sight of more Indians. With no choice but to take her along, Blocker has to watch this wailing woman more closely even than his prisoners, as she seems dead set on suicide.

One of the great pleasures of Hostiles rests in beholding its makers’ great sensitivity to the ever-changing landscape over the northward course of roughly 1,500 miles. Cooper’s West is not a generic one but a series of progressions, from deserts and open plains to moist green forests and rugged mountains. Cinematographer Masanobu Takayanagi captures it all splendidly but without fuss, while production designer Donald Graham Burt has contributed sharply contrasting accounts of two army outposts.

Contemplative and absorbing rather than rip-roaring and exciting, the film will likely play better to Western connoisseurs than to general and younger audiences, but it’s an estimable piece of work grounded by a fine-grain sensibility and an expertly judged lead performance.

09.17.2016

A couple of more reviews of “A United Kingdom” came out. Be sure to check out the snippets below and click on the links to check out the full reviews!

“The performances from Pike and Oyelowo are terrific. Pike has been doing solid work for years, but with her astonishing turn in Gone Girl, it feels like she’s finally being given the lead roles she deserves. She brings a restrained strength to Ruth while also allowing for vulnerability, and she and Oyelowo make a dynamite team.” – Collider

“Oyelowo exudes quiet dignity but he can belt out a rousing speech when he needs to, and Pike genuinely seems to be enjoying herself as Ruth transforms, little by little, from shrinking violet to jeep-driving, baby-swaddling, authority-baiting queen of the veldt.” – Time Out

“Although some of the dialogue is a little expository and on the nose, particularly in the early stages of the film, there is a connection between Pike and Oyelowo which feels authentic and warm.” – Screen Daily

Pike and Oyelowo have a hearty, wholemeal chemistry together, and play their small moments with sincerity and a light elegance.” – The Telegraph

09.14.2016

“A United Kingdom” had its world premiere yesterday during the Toronto International Film Festival and the first reviews are out now. Unfortunately Rosamund skipped the premiere but below we’ve assembled a selection of quotes from the reviews. While the reviews have good things to say about Rosamund they tend to agree that the film is a bit simplistic.

Pike’s Ruth is just a plucky, average, post-war Englishwoman until she is forced to draw on reserves of courage and intelligence to face adversity. The scene of her driving herself to a local hospital with contractions and giving birth screaming shows the stuff she’s made of.” – Hollywood Reporter

“And Pike, as a woman who doesn’t know what she’s getting into but has the inner reservoirs of strength to rise to the occasion, knows how to navigate a role that’s significantly less complex and nuanced than, say, “Gone Girl,” in the process creating a woman to root for.” – TheWrap

“As for Pike, the fact that she is tall makes her interestingly of equal height with her lead, a pleasing visual approximation of their equal partnership in this morganatic marriage. She has a great moment in their early days of their courtship when her sister Muriel (Laura Carmichael) excitedly reads the note he has just sent, inviting Ruth to a dance and saying he could get an extra ticket if she would like to take her sister too. “But I wouldn’t like to take you!” sighs Ruth in an ecstasy of romantic certainty.” – The Guardian

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09.39.2014

With all the Gone Girl news you’d almost forget that Rosamund had another movie coming out. I found a review for What We Did On Our Holiday. Check out the entire review at this site.

Pike and Tennant are both very convincing in a wits end portrayal of parenthood, juggling the attempts to manage every childhood issue with the very real problems of the end of their own relationship, trying to remain calm when all around them is begging them to lose control. The script here is probably most impressive, suggesting an understanding reserved for those that have lived through the relationship issues witnessed here. Thankfully, this never becomes too overbearing, with both Hamilton an Jenkin clearly keen to veer away from becoming too bogged down in these potentially depressing plot pitfalls and instead keeping the mood airy and light for long periods, which given the plot, is no mean feat at all.

09.14.2014
C.   /   Film Reviews#Gone Girl   /   0 Comments

Seems like the first reviews are really coming out now. This time I have the review from Variety for you. Once again they have great things to say about Rosamund’s portrayal of Amy. Check their website for the full review and read the part about Rosamund below.

Still, as its title suggests, “Gone Girl” belongs to its leading lady. Pike is the sort of elegantly composed blonde beauty with whom Hitchcock would have had a field day, and some may well quibble that the actress’s cool British hauteur doesn’t fully capture Amy’s America’s-sweetheart side. Yet as evidenced by her years of solid supporting work, she also possesses the sort of ferocious charisma that magnetizes the screen, and it’s a thrill to watch her fully embrace the showiest, most substantial role of her career. Hers is the low, seductive voice we hear coaxing us through the story’s early passages, and hers is the character who ultimately exhibits the most dynamic range: In any given scene, her Amy can seem vulnerable, aggrieved, calculating, heroic, overmatched, viperous and terrifying.

09.50.2014
C.   /   Film Reviews#Gone Girl   /   0 Comments

The Hollywood Reporter has written a great review for Rosamund’s upcoming movie Gone Girl and they have great things to say about Rosamund’s and her co-star Ben Affleck’s performance. Check out the entire review on THR.com and read some snippets about Rosamund below.

A good-looking pair of New York writers, Amy (Rosamund Pike) and Nick (Ben Affleck) were uprooted and transplanted, quite infelicitously, to small-town Missouri, thanks to a financial setback and Nick’s father’s illness. Glamorous and sexy back East, they quickly became grating and loveless as they knocked around a personality-free house in one of the world’s most boring places.

Affleck, who has never been more ideally cast, delivers a beautiful balancing act of a performance, fostering both sympathy and the suspicion that his true self lies somewhere between shallow jerk and heartless murderer. Pike, who has been notable in several roles over the past dozen years (Pride & Prejudice, Jack Reacher) but has rarely played full-blown leads, is powerful and commanding. Making Amy even steelier and more brazen than one might have imagined, she evinces no vulnerability but, rather, a strong sense of self-worth, as Amy seems to dare others to size themselves up against her. Physically and emotionally, Pike looks to have immersed herself in this profoundly calculating character, and the results are impressive.

Along with the parallel structural device and alternating narrative voices, what distinguishes the novel Gone Girl from any number of other modern mystery thrillers is its corrosive view of marriage, a theme amply underlined by Pike’s spiky performance.