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Archive for the ‘Projects’ Category
By Carmel
Oct 13, 2014

By Carmel
Oct 13, 2014

Turning into a watercooler sensation, David Fincher’s Gone Girl easily stayed at No. 1 in its second weekend, trumping a flood of new films with $26.8 million from 3,284 theaters. The adult thriller, starring Ben Affleck and Rosamund Pike, fell a scant 29 percent.

The film’s stellar hold puts the big screen adaptation of Gillian Flynn’s popular novel on track to become Fincher’s top-grossing film in North America, not accounting for inflation. His best showing to date is The Curious Case of Benjamin Button ($127.5 million). Through Sunday, its 10th day in release, Gone Girl’s domestic total is $78.3 million for 20th Century Fox and New Regency.

“David Fincher has crafted a provocative thriller about marriage that has clearly touched a nerve with audiences,” Fox domestic distribution chief Chris Aronson said. “It’s pretty exciting.”

Gone Girl also continued to soar overseas, earning $27 million from 52 markets for a foreign total of $63.3 million and world haul of $141.6 million.

Universal and Legendary Pictures’ origins pic Dracula Untold, fueled by males (57 percent), came in No. 2 with $23.5 million from 2,889 theaters.

Source

By Carmel
Oct 06, 2014

“Gone Girl” and “Annabelle” enjoyed sizzling debut weekends, as David Fincher’s adaptation of Gillian Flynn’s best-seller racked up $38 million and “The Conjuring” spin-off scared up $37.2 million.

The films’ debuts continue a fall box office turnaround following a devastating summer for the movie business. The overall box office was up nearly 20% from the same weekend a year ago when “Gravity” lifted off to $55.8 million.

“We were due for some breakout performances,” said Phil Contrino, vice president and chief analyst at BoxOffice.com “The market has the ability to expand if there are two quality films in it, even if both are R-rated thrillers.”

Produced by 20th Century Fox and New Regency for $61 million, “Gone Girl” unspooled across 3,013 locations. It ranks as the biggest debut of Fincher’s career, topping “Panic Room’s” $30 million premiere, and the third best in Ben Affleck’s, behind “Daredevil’s” $40.3 million and “Pearl Harbor’s” $59.1 million openers. “Gone Girl” and “Annabelle” are the tenth and eleventh biggest October debuts in history.

The film was aided by fans of the book, Affleck’s recent hot streak at the box office and superb reviews, as “Gone Girl” received nearly a 90% “fresh” rating on Rotten Tomatoes. With its hard R rating and chilly look at a marriage from hell, Fox was conservative going into the weekend, insisting it would be happy with a debut in the $20 million range. Early tracking suggested they’d have to content themselves with that kind of number. After the film received an enthusiastic reception at last weekend’s New York Film Festival, the numbers began to tick upwards.

“David Fincher made an incredibly provocative film,” said Chris Aronson, president of domestic distribution at Fox. “We did an excellent job of marketing the movie and making it a cultural event where people had to see it in order to be part of the conversation.”

It continues Fox’s torrid run at the multiplexes this year. The studio has a clear lead in market share thanks to hits such as “X-Men: Days of Future Past,” “The Fault in Our Stars” and “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes,” after three consecutive years in sixth place. It still has “Exodus: Gods and Kings” and “Night at the Museum: Secret of the Tomb” left to open among its upcoming releases.

“Gone Girl’s” opening weekend audience was 60% female and skewed older with 75% of the audience over the age of 25, according to Rentrak. Aronson said he was surprised the film was so evenly balanced between the genders.

“That’s a testament to the film becoming a zeitgeisty film,” he said.

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Like the lead character she portrays in the widely anticipated movie version of “Gone Girl,” Rosamund Pike fell off nearly everyone’s radar.

At the tender age of 21, the British actress was cast as the sultry Miranda Frost, a sword-wielding vixen in the James Bond film “Die Another Day,” her first studio feature. She powdered on enough makeup to look a decade older, donned a black sports bra, and met an untimely demise with a knife to her heart. Onscreen, she was killed by Halle Berry. Offscreen, she suffered a far worse blow to her budding career.

The baggage of playing a Bond Girl backfired. “It cemented a sort of patrician, frigid, English, standoffish cold image,” says Pike, over breakfast in September at the Toronto Film Festival. “People think I lie about my age. I never had a chance to do those young roles.” After her high-profile gig in the 2002 Bond picture, the actress persevered for years in supporting parts, in films such as “Pride & Prejudice,” “An Education” and “Barney’s Version.”

But all that changed in July 2013 when she landed her first lead in a movie — as Amy Dunne in David Fincher’s thriller “Gone Girl” — the most coveted role of the year. “I’ve always been given roles that are more mature than I am,” says Pike, 35. “Now it could be that it’ll all start reversing, and I’ll stay around 30.”


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By Carmel
Oct 01, 2014

Yesterday Rosamund attended the official Academy members screening of Gone Girl. Rosamund looked great in a Vera Wang dress paired with Prada shoes. She sat down with NY Daily News entertainment columnist Joe Neumaier to talk about the movie.

By Carmel
Oct 01, 2014

Rosamund was spotted entering different studios in New York city to promote Gone Girl on September 29. Photos have been added to our gallery.